The Great Conversation
The New Value Proposition of Policing

The New Value Proposition of Policing

October 31, 2022

As a strategic advisor to CEOs, helping to create the story that drives their organization and helping them achieve the promise of that story, I created The Path to Value. It was my way of learning. It was my way of teaching. And learning. And teaching.

I have been able to see and feel first-hand, the attempt of leaders with a background in law enforcement, military, and agency, to become strategic advisors to the business. The best ones attempt to learn the language of the operational leaders of the business. They listen to the value proposition these leaders make for their contribution to the whole business. This informs and infuses their work. In many cases, it changes how they approach their profession.

Law enforcement has been through a roller coaster over the years. Its leaders and officers are being confronted with a new generation and new rules that are challenging their morale and their work. I found one leader who seems energized by this time and place. He is learning the value proposition of his “customer” and leveraging them to create a force multiplier in risk management.

His name is Mike Zegadlo. He is Chief of Police at Lewis University in Romeoville, Illinois. He was an educator and trainer before entering law enforcement. He has leveraged this to create relationships in the community and at the school that is changing the perception of law enforcement. It also is elevating their value.

We have a great conversation around the people, process, and tools he is leveraging to bring the art and practice of policing to the next level.

The Stories that Influence Leaders

The Stories that Influence Leaders

October 31, 2022

History can teach us a lot about the repercussions of change. The impact of change is accelerated by the confluence of events, crisis upon crisis.

Imagine if you were able to imagine it before it happened thereby providing the white space to adapt and innovate mitigating the impact of the change.

This is how this great conversation begins with an author that leverages research of our world and imagines scenarios that government and private sector leaders must see to help us all. Rather than a white paper, his “useful fiction” captures the interest and then the mind of the leader.

Peter Warren Singer is Strategist at New America, a Professor of Practice at Arizona State University, and Founder & Managing Partner at Useful Fiction LLC.

New York Times Bestselling author, described in the Wall Street Journal as “the premier futurist in the national-security environment” and “all-around smart guy” in the Washington Post, he has been named by the Smithsonian as one of the nation’s 100 leading innovators, by Defense News as one of the 100 most influential people in defense issues, by Foreign Policy to their Top 100 Global Thinkers List, and as an official “Mad Scientist” for the U.S. Army’s Training and Doctrine Command.

Single Source of Truth: In Security, in Business, and in Life

Single Source of Truth: In Security, in Business, and in Life

October 31, 2022

“It is hard to breathe, and my heart is palpitating like a drum. I am feeling weak – I want to lie on the ground so the world stops spinning for a minute and I can catch my breath.

A thousand thoughts cross my mind. What if this goes wrong? What if I can’t deliver that? What if I can no longer support my family and be there for them? What kind of example will I be to my children? I have everything I thought I wanted, but I am still not happy.”

This comes from the prologue of How to Beat Burnout with Gratitude by Marcelo Carvalho, Vice President of Cybersecurity, Capital One ·

The book was written from Marcelo’s experience in life and business. We have a great conversation with the book in mind by starting with his career at GE where he worked closely to embed a single source of truth cybersecurity architecture into the core methodology of a critical product manufacturing practice. Through this conversation we explore how he did that and find organizational change and transformation theory come to life. Security becomes part of an empowered culture and as well as the engineering process.

Then we turn from this business integration into another way of looking at a single source of truth to guide us personally and professionally. Through this leader’s transparent sharing of his own experience, we find ourselves on our own path to value.

The Future belongs to the Data Driven Organization

The Future belongs to the Data Driven Organization

October 31, 2022

We are data driven. As leaders, we need the right data to make effective decisions. But most of the data that is provided to us only shows what happened. We are making decisions based by staring in a rear-view mirror.

But what if we could forecast the future? What if the data we have collected can be leveraged to provide us scenarios that will provide us a glimpse into the impact our decisions would have on the future of our organizations.

Most of the assumptions we make are based on an incomplete picture.

As we have said in past conversations, CEOs are paid to navigate risk and opportunity. How do I understand all the variables in my future decision making? Do I put my finger in the air and make a choice anyway?!

There are many tools that can help you organize and understand the risk models in your plan. 80-90% of the variables in your decision making can be captured. You can use computing power to go through them, check on the integrity of the numbers, sensitivities, scenario waterfalls that go beyond the numbers. The goal is to understand what the data is telling you before the future happens.

Most C-Level executives have people who run the numbers and the variables. They are often called analysts. They create the frameworks or models for the executives who don’t want to see the data engine and tool, (the single source of truth) but see the data take shape so a decision can be made.

The model architecture can than display functional context so executives can see how the data uniquely applies to them, and they can change data that is unique to them. But each contextualized input than impacts the whole picture. Executive teams who have this ability have the opportunity to see a clearer picture of how the sum of the parts impacts the whole.

In this conversation we go through this and then I ask the data strategist to apply the concept to the Chief Security Officer who is attempting to embed themselves in the contextualized risk and opportunity of the C-Suite. We have a great conversation about a big idea. Can we turn this technology approach into a qualitative tool to manage risk, resilience, security, and the opportunities that can be leveraged from a wholistic view of risk.

Gianluca Bisceglie is the Founder & CEO at Visyond Technologist. He also is a strategist, private equity executive, and entrepreneur with broad international experience across both mature and emerging markets.

Visyond is a cloud-native enterprise SaaS company that transforms spreadsheets into decision-making platforms to drive performance.

Prior to founding Visyond, he worked in Private Equity in the Middle East and in Russia, responsible for the identification, screening, due diligence, and execution of investment opportunities in various industries.

He is a regular guest speaker and a mentor at various universities and accelerators.

Gianluca holds an MBA with Distinction from London Business School and an MEng in Electronics Engineering from the Polytechnic of Turin (Italy).

Living Life on Purpose: The End of TGIF

Living Life on Purpose: The End of TGIF

October 2, 2022

Imagine there will be four eulogies at your funeral. One will come from a family member. One will come from a friend. One will come from someone you worked with. And another will be delivered by someone who represented how you gave back to the world (Perhaps a charity or ministry).

Now write what they might say today. You might discover something about yourself. It might change the course of your life. You might want to write them again with your new aspirations in mind.

This conversation ends on that note. But where my guest takes us is through a journey of self-discovery intersecting our unique powers, purpose, and passions. If we seek, we shall find, and it will change how our lives flow and flourish.

Tony Davis is the Founder and Chairman of Dovetail Business Solutions (Pty) Ltd and Next Level Insights Group. He is an entrepreneur, consultant, advisor, and a passionate evangelist of “Living your Life on Purpose", which happens to be the book he is currently writing.

You don’t have to be waiting for the week to end (TGIF) or for retirement to begin living.

Enjoy a purpose-filled great conversation!

Great Leaders Ask Great Questions

Great Leaders Ask Great Questions

October 2, 2022

Are you a diminisher or a multiplier? Do you bring all the answers to the table, or do you help others solve problems? Do you believe you are the best voice in the room?

Our guest learned the hard way, that he was a diminisher. He would take a great idea from his staff, acknowledge it, and then suggest how to make it better. After all, that is what great leaders do; make them better.

Bob Tiede is prolific author, blogger, and trainer on how to develop leaders through questions. His book, Leading with Questions has been published in 190+ nations around the world. He has spoken with and met some of the greatest minds around this subject and he shares these stories twice a week on his free subscriber list.

He calls himself a charter member of TA…Tellers Anonymous. And most of us are. We love talking about ourselves and jumping in the arena to help. But we forget the meaningful excavation that can occur with a genuine curiosity in another. through a series of questions. The excavation can produce a rich vein of gold but not if we are filling the hole we were digging with our dirt.

One of the key takeaways from our conversation was the scorecard for a great leader. “Good leaders count their followers”, said Bob. “Great leaders measure the leaders they have developed.”

Bob began this journey in a bookstore when he picked up Leading with Questions: How Leaders Find the Right Solutions by Knowing What to Ask by Michael J. Marquardt. It was a 2x4 over his head. He was suddenly self-aware. And to seek restitution he turned the book into a training class which was successful. And then he turned it into his first book.

In my practice, we realize that most people start talking after getting an answer to a question. They have learned everything there is to know. But then they miss the answer behind the question. The answer they will never receive. The knowledge never gained. The wisdom never achieved.

Listen to a man with a teller addiction tell his stories. This is not your average ted-talk version of The Great Conversation. You will need some time. But it is worth it. Enjoy.

Security Executives Defined by Their Value, Not by Their Title

Security Executives Defined by Their Value, Not by Their Title

October 2, 2022

Words are real things. When conveyed through the written word or articulated in a speech, they have the power to direct and shape individual behavior and markets.

With this mind, I would like to discuss what it means to be a professional. I believe we can agree that it infers a ranking conferred by education, skill, or training. Markets show their maturity by the establishment of formal standards that are then used to judge the competency of an individual or product. If they pass the test, they often get a certification that can be aligned with their personal or product brand.

The largest security association in the world is ASIS International. They are an established Standards Developing Organization. That unique role and its associated processes create the context for incubating and formalizing standards and guidelines that drive behavior in the risk, resilience, and security industry.

In our latest conversation, we asked a member of the ASIS committee that has been reviewing, amending, and, he would argue, enhancing the Chief Security Officer Standard originally published in 2004. It will now be called “Senior Security Executive”.

Our conversation takes us back to a time when Physical Security was associated with gates, guns, and guards. And Cyber Security was an IT Management function. Security was not often viewed as a member of the executive team. Largely, the leaders in the security industry did not have a voice because they did not know the language of business. Thus, people were advocating for a job description for a corporate role. Chief Security Officer (CSO), as a title, became the focus.

This conversation centers around the value of a title vs. a role. The new standard will be debated among the original committee and their advocates and many who have benefited from these early adopters. But this new standard has the opportunity to reframe the role in terms of the business.

It the role is reframed and articulated to the business correctly, it will act as a touchstone for reframing security from a solely defensive role into one that acts as a pivotal advisor to the business and its leaders as they navigate risk and opportunity. The framework is expressed through a published guideline: Enterprise Security Risk Management (ESRM). It describes the enterprise security risk management (ESRM) approach and explains how it can enhance a security program while aligning security resources with organizational strategy to manage risk. Utilizing ESRM security professionals work with asset owners to identify and prioritize assets and risks in order to mitigate those risks and create a holistic security program that supports the organization’s mission.

The gentlemen we spoke with, Michael Gips, Principal of Global Insights in Professional Security has been a top influencer in the industry for over 20 years and is recognized as such by his peers.

Listen to this walk through the history of a profession seeking influence in the vision, mission, and execution of the business. The opportunity is enormous. And it is now.

Enjoy the conversation.

Learning the Art of Credibility

Learning the Art of Credibility

October 2, 2022

If you were known to be trustworthy. If you engendered trust from others, how would it change your life and your world?

Our great conversation with a global credibility expert, Mitchell Levy, is really about saving our humanity and changing the trajectory of our lives.

Mitchell is an international bestselling author of over 60 books, and an executive coach at Marshall Goldsmith’s 100 Coaches. After interviewing 500 thought leaders on credibility, he published a 7-country international bestselling book, delivered a powerful TEDx on humanity, created courses, and created the Credibility Nation membership community to help those live, learn and surround themselves with others on the credibility journey.

He’s an accomplished entrepreneur who has created twenty businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 750 books. He’s provided strategic consulting to hundreds of companies and has been the chairman of a board of a NASDAQ-listed company.

Mitchell is all about finding people he can trust and being trustworthy in return. Along the way he leveraged the term credibility, to describe the 10 values. Those values describe our character and the perception of your character.

Why be credible? If we are credible, we will be humane to one another. If we are credible, we will form relationships that will prosper our lives and those around us.

This is an inspiring conversation, but also a practical one. Mitchell takes us through his process for listening to what you value and what you do and helps you with a brief description that can be used in any social or business setting that immediately underlines your credibility. And then he can show you how to manifest it in the messaging around your personal and professional brand.

Enjoy the conversation.

The Urgency to Understand the Larger Story of Another

The Urgency to Understand the Larger Story of Another

September 1, 2022

The power of story. It influences our lives. We have a personal story, fed by the evolutionary stages of story from our culture, our tribes, and our family. Story describes our core values and the why of our journey.

If you built a business model to help people, companies, and governments understand their identity through story as well as the stories of others you might be able to create a powerful and sustainable engagement that could lead to constructive relationships throughout our world. You might be able to avoid war. You might be able to solve some of the world’s largest problems.

Narrative Strategies has done that. We sat down and talked with the Vice President of Strategy, Paul Cobaugh to help us understand story’s place and its potential. What we found is a different language to describe how stories feed a larger narrative identity, with story being a puzzle piece.

The puzzle creates a picture that tells you something. The stories tell only a piece. Assemble them together and it becomes a narrative of a family, culture, or company.

Since Paul is a veteran, he pulls examples of how he intuitively understood this in his work around the world.

It seems so simple. So simple that it is largely ignored by people in power. But a few are listening. And that is good. The future of our country may depend on it.

Someone needs to be in place to understand the collective stories of our enemies, so we can articulate our ideas and touch their narrative identities. That someone is a “narrator”. The narrator needs to be in it for the long game because relationships based on narrative identity require sustained engagement. And the narrator needs to have a sense of urgency so that our ideas can help shape the future narrative identities of the world. The story is unfolding right now. And we have a front row seat.

Time to have a great conversation!

Bringing to the Surface What is Below the Surface

Bringing to the Surface What is Below the Surface

September 1, 2022

I met a leader who is a Doctor of Law (JD), is certified on the Essentials of Workplace Violence and Intervention through ASIS, an Instructor at a world-renowned Advanced Threat Assessment Academy, and is a strategic partner in the vision and mission of her organization.

In her role as instructor, she teaches representatives from government, law enforcement, higher education and K12, mental/brhavioral health professionals, and Fortune-500 companies.

I was curious how she pulled all these disciplines together as a leader and as a person.

Melissa Muir, is Director of Human Resources and Organizational Development at the City of Shoreline in Washington State,

The conversation starts with a question: “What does it mean to be in Human Resources these days? And where is it going in the future.?

We hear about a great re-imagining what it means to be at work. What we want to keep, foster, and what is no longer important as the world changes. And I ultimately ask: “How do you get to courage and trust with teams? To call out the elephant in the room.”

Melissa calls it “Bringing to the Surface what is below the Surface”

And through the conversation we learn we have an essential and great power to direct the story of our organization and the people within it.

Enjoy this great conversation.

Leading is a Verb. Learn It, Then Teach It

Leading is a Verb. Learn It, Then Teach It

September 1, 2022

I tracked down an incredible thought leader on systems and practices. I thought we would be exploring how to execute. Instead, I found a set of ideas that can be put into action. This is important. A set of ideas is not a task list or a set of commands.

If they become that, you are in danger of not finding out what works and what doesn’t. Because you have given them the recipe but not the authority to let them cook.

Dr. Thom Mayer is Founder and Chief Executive Officer of BestPractices, Inc., Executive Vice President of EmCare, the Medical Director for the NFL Players Association and Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine at George Washington University and a Senior Lecturing Fellow at Duke University.

He is one of the most widely-sought speakers on healthcare customer service, trauma and emergency care, pediatric emergency care, medical leadership, and sports medicine. He has published over 70 peer-reviewed articles, 75 book chapters, and has edited or written 12 textbooks on emergency medicine, including Leadership for Great Customer Service: Satisfied Patients, Satisfied Employees, Leadership for Smooth Patient Flow, Hardwiring Flow, and Strauss and Mayer’s Emergency Department Leadership: Principles and Applications. Tom Peters, the internationally acclaimed leadership guru, has referred to his work as “gaspworthy.” Dr. Mayer was named the ACEP Outstanding Speaker of the Year in the second year the award was given and has twice been named ACEP’s “Over-the-Top” award winner.

On September 11, 2001 Dr. Mayer served as one of the Command Physicians at the Pentagon Rescue Operation, coordinating medical assets at the site. The BestPractices physicians at Inova Fairfax Hospital were the first to successfully diagnose and treat inhalational anthrax victims during the fall 2001 anthrax crises, and Dr. Mayer has served on the Department of Defense on Defense Science Board Task Forces on Bioterrorism, Homeland Security and Consequences of Weapons of Mass Destruction. Dr. Mayer also serves as a Medical Director for the Studer Group.

What I learned:

  1. Leadership is worthless but leading is priceless. Leadership is a noun. Leading is a verb delivered with an active voice. You are already a leader.

  2. Every team member is a leader.

  3. Every team member is a performance athlete. Invest in yourself and your team.

  4. The work begins within.

If I take these and hardwire them into my life. I would practice the following:

  • I would wake up every morning and say “I am a leader”

  • Invest in myself. Spend time getting better at leading.

  • Review every day what is working and what is not.

  • Find a way to help others leveraging what I have learned.

  • Celebrate with “3 Good Things” that are happening. Connect it to an action; that is, what did I do that helped make those 3 good things happen?

Enjoy the conversation.

Beyond the Fenceline: The Mindset of the Next Generation Executive

Beyond the Fenceline: The Mindset of the Next Generation Executive

September 1, 2022

Scott Lindahl, VP Corporate Services & Chief Security Officer, at Kellogg Company sat down with me in a great conversation around his journey that led him to begin using this language and adopting the behavior of a corporate leader.

Scott’s journey entailed working in manufacturing, retail, financial services as well as a small security services firm. Along the way he studied how salespeople interacted with clients. And he found the best ones had a way of creating a conversation through the power of great questions.

He adopted this as his career matured and, as a result, began to learn not only the business but also the personal and professional drivers of his corporate customers. This approach became the framework that guided his own behavior and those that worked under him. He would call this “freedom within a framework”

With this basic understanding of his journey, we then began to talk about the future. Leaders in every part of an organization are dealing with the same macro and micro issues. The speed of change is accelerating and impacting the way we get things done. Technology, in many cases, is acting as the lever. Scott believes that one of the keys is how to see the whole picture. This will naturally lead us to better ways of gathering and harnessing information that is critical to our organization’s risk and opportunity.

If CSO’s do this well, they can help the CEO and their executive team navigate the road ahead.

Enjoy the conversation.

A Cry for Help: The Pathway of Violence

A Cry for Help: The Pathway of Violence

August 1, 2022

I am always looking for the seeds of a disruptive new way of thinking. This often is the genesis of a new model for doing business or a new model for governance within a family, association, community, or nation.

From this, new tools are provided to affect the idea and the model. New technologies are created.

In this great conversation, we speak with Marisa Randazzo, Ph.D, Executive Director for the Ontic Center of Excellence,

Through the convergence of her academic experience and her applied research in the field, she became known as an international expert in behavioral threat assessment and protective intelligence, specializing in preventing school shootings, workplace violence, stalking, and assassinations. Before joining forces with Ontic, she was the CEO of SIGMA Threat Management Associates.

She helps me understand the pathway to violence and its potential at stopping violent crimes before they happen. And we explore the ways we can train people be active ‘sensors’ in picking up the signals of a potential threat before it happens. These people sensors are now being augmented by technology that can help collect, manage, and communicate the data creating the means to stop an incident before it happens.

We learn that most potential perpetrators are human beings crying for help. They are not sociopaths or psychopaths or monsters. They are not intrinsically evil. Their acts are.

This basic logic ladder called the pathway to violence is a useful construct for creating innovation and change that our country desperately requires.

Enjoy the conversation.

The Path to Creating a Team

The Path to Creating a Team

August 1, 2022

Voracious Learners!

Monica Duperon Rodriquez is Senior Manager of Global Security and Risk Management (Executive Protection) at LinkedIn.

When we sat down to have a great conversation, she immediately drew me into her path to creating a team.

What we find is a deep understanding that developing people and teams takes an investment in knowing who they are. From there you can begin to create partnerships that take the one-on-one relationships and the collaborative team relationships to the next level.

You can hear it in her voice. She is what she preaches: self-aware, authentic, caring, and collaborative. A great foundation for leading people on their path to value.

Enjoy the conversation.

Leveraging Security and Safety for Competitive Advantage

Leveraging Security and Safety for Competitive Advantage

August 1, 2022

If a CEO’s primary role is navigating risk and opportunity, then they must have a risk, resilience, and security team who is prepared to be at the table.

To be prepared, the Chief Security Officer (CSO) and their team must understand the unique value of their role in supporting the mission and vision of the company. Then they must organize around the interconnected relationships of others who are attempting to create outcomes that matter to the business. And they must find a way to leverage intelligence locally and globally that provides them insights that support the contextual application of risk for the leaders of their company. This is also where the core values of the culture will be engendered and supported.

I find this to be rare.

Because of this, I was absolutely engaged when Debbie Maples, the Vice President of Global Safety & Security: Security Operations, Investigations & Protection at Salesforce, sat down with me in a great conversation around the heart, mind, discipline, and tools of the leadership of the risk, safety, and security leadership of her company.

Just as her company, Salesforce, is in the pursuit of being the premier cloud-based software designed to help businesses find more prospects, close more deals, and wow customers with amazing service, their safety and security team seeks to be premier in risk intelligence, investigations, travel safety and security. Their mindset: the foundation of finding great people, keeping them engaged in the business, and supporting their felt needs, takes a unique blend of leadership, business process, data aggregation platforms, and a passion for service within risk, resilience, safety, and security.

This was truly a great conversation. Enjoy!

We are in Tomorrow

We are in Tomorrow

August 1, 2022

One of the leaders in our Great Conversation community sent me a brief but compelling message:

I want to introduce you to Hans Nyamie for your next Great Conversation. Hans is one of the most interesting people I have spoken with in a long time. He is focused on facility space planning and technology.

When I went to his LinkedIn it told me very little

Workplace and FM Systems Specialist (incl: Agile/Activity Based Working,Space Management & Administration)

Not a lot to go on. But I arranged a call with him although our time differential was significant. London vs. Seattle!

What I found is the anthropomorphic version of glue-ware. Hans seeks to integrate and harmonize the interests of the user, the integrator, and the business around the form, function, and purpose of space.

More importantly, when he is not focused on his existing projects, he is exploring the future meaning of the spaces we occupy. Because the continuous and accelerating change we are experiencing requires a degree of agility and adaptation that the current built environments we have today are not equipped to handle.

In 2021, Facebook announced its future focus on the Metaverse. And our spaces must reflect this new digital transformation. We have a great conversation around space, place, and the future.

Enjoy.

The 5 Pillars of a Strategic Security Program

The 5 Pillars of a Strategic Security Program

August 1, 2022

I meet many people who are unconscious competents. They intuitively know what to do, and largely are successful at doing it.

And then there are the conscious competents. They took the time to understand what they do including the why of it, and the value of it. They document, teach, and, most importantly for any leader competing for funds, sell their program to their stakeholders.

I met Bill Marcisz when he was the Executive Director of Security, Safety, and Emergency Management at AdventHealth in Central Florida. AdventHealth is known as a trailblazer in their research and their use of emerging technology.

Bill not only ran this critically acclaimed program, but he also was called upon as a nationally recognized and Board-Certified Security Expert. After all he has over 40-Years of Security & Legal Experience.

He retired from AdventHealth to devote his energies as the President & Chief Consultant for Strategic Security Management Consulting, Inc. (SSMC)

SSMC provides litigation support to both Plaintiffs and Defense clients. His trial testimony alone has assisted in attaining jury awards up to $13.5 Million.

Bill has also received peer review awards for developing an Outstanding Security Program from both the American Society of Industrial Security (ASIS) and International Association for Healthcare Security & Safety (IAHSS).

Bill also received the award for Outstanding Performance by a Director of Security from the American Society for Industrial Security (ASIS). This is considered as one of the most prestigious achievements in the Security profession.

Bill shared with us his thoughts on the key components of a strategic security program and what it takes to position it for value.

Enjoy the conversation.

The Power of Story for your Organization and your People

The Power of Story for your Organization and your People

July 1, 2022

Vitaly Geyman had a great conversation with us several months ago that we called “The Organization is not a Machine; It is a Person”. We explored the traditional view and practice that led to the organizations being treated like a machine. Machines are meant to be programmed, streamlined, and optimized. Efficiency and predictability are the core principles. Management’s key responsibility is the machine’s design and programming while the employees’ role is to contribute their efforts according to the machine’s design.

Vitaly suggested a wider perspective where we view the organization as a living system. We see that it operates in the context of an ecosystem of interdependent entities working together for the good of the whole. We see how it can learn and adapt to its environment. Going beyond a living system perspective and viewing it as a living being shifts our focus and opens up new possibilities. We see it as a creative force contributing to our world. We see it as one who can learn and adopt, sense and respond. We see it as a living person with a soul, a heart and a personality to be nurtured and developed. We help it grow in capability and maturity so that it can reach its fullest potential.

In this conversation we explore how he works with clients. As a business strategist myself, I recognize the power of his approach: To learn the past, present, and future story that is being told by the leaders and the prevailing culture and then to integrate this story into the operational fabric of the organization. Stories create alignment if especially if you allow your people to contribute to the story. The chapters of innovation that could be written and released may change the world.

Enjoy the conversation.

The Mind, Culture, and Readiness of Risk and the Business

The Mind, Culture, and Readiness of Risk and the Business

July 1, 2022

We need a wider lens in business. We have been trained to think in terms of specialization and we have created silos of information that serve our interests. But the platform for widening our lens is now available. And more than ever we need that lens.

With that said, if we scrape the top layer of the news, we are dealing with illness as a threat, disinformation as a threat, privacy vs. safety and security as a threat, and the proliferation of actors who are inspired to action by the fear of change promulgated by the social and public media. I needed to speak with someone who understood all of these things and is helping executives reassess how they identify, manage, and respond to threats to their people, processes, tools, and organizational outcomes.

I could not help myself. When I have a chance to pick the brain of a person who has the training and experience as a licensed psychologist, certified health service provider in psychology, and as a state-certified police officer (now retired from law enforcement), I know I am going to get a unique perspective leveraging the field of forensic & law enforcement psychology and the work in behavioral threat assessment & management.

Since 1993, Gene Deisinger has served as the director of threat management for major organizations. He has provided training and consultation on behavioral threat assessment and management issues to a range of schools, colleges, universities, corporations and non-profit organizations, governmental, military, intelligence and law enforcement agencies.

He also provides training and consulting to law enforcement agencies regarding leadership and organizational development, crisis management, preparation and response to active threat incidents, response to persons with mental illness, hostage/crisis intervention, and post-incident trauma response.

We have a great conversation; wide ranging, with a thread connecting the subjects we touched on: to the degree we are investing in the purpose-driven connection between our stakeholders lives and our business, lies the strength and resilience of our organization.

The Innovation Hub for Loss Prevention and Security

The Innovation Hub for Loss Prevention and Security

July 1, 2022

Our world operates on a highly leveraged business model that depends on the belief in a civil society. A society of agreed upon values doesn’t require police presence in every store and stoplight. There are laws that are respected and adhered to by an engaged citizenry.

But what happens when this breaks down? Where there is intentionality in the crime, you have a mindset and a process that you can study, patterns you can document, and technology to help your drive predictability and post-event discovery.

Dr. Read Hayes is a research scientist at the University of Florida as well as the Director of the Loss Prevention Research Council (LPRC). The LPRC is made up of researchers, retailers, solution partners, manufacturers, law enforcement professionals and many more who believe developing a community will lead to a safer world.

The Loss Prevention Research Council was founded in 2000 by leading retailers and Dr. Read Hayes in an effort to support the evidence-based needs of loss prevention decision-makers. Founding retailers include Target, Walmart, OfficeMax, CVS, GAP, Home Depot, Beall’s, Barnes and Noble, and has grown to over 70 major retail chains today. To date the LPRC has conducted over 300 real-world loss prevention research projects for retailers and partners.

Dr. Hayes and I discuss the purpose and strategies of the ecosystem the LPRC has developed, its findings and impact, and his work in developing a framework for early detection. Although the focus is retail, he knows his research, findings, and the proof of concepts he is developing with leading technology providers will translate into the smart buildings and cities of the future.

Protecting at the Speed of Risk

Protecting at the Speed of Risk

July 1, 2022

You only represent 2% of the population, but you are the most targeted religious group in the country with over 60% of the hate crimes committed against your constituency. You can’t sit on the sidelines. You must be engaged with the right people, process, technology, and partners if you hope to provide protection in the “most complex, dynamic, risk environment ever”.

We engaged the Principal Deputy Director and COO, Patrick Daly of the Secure Community Network (SCN) to help us understand what the threat is and how to mitigate and respond to it.

SCN is The Secure Community Network (SCN) is the official safety and security organization of the Jewish community in North America. It provides Intelligence and Information Sharing, Facility Assessments, Physical Security Solution Support, Training, Exercise and Education, a partnership with Law Enforcement, and Incident Response and Crisis Management.

Patrick is responsible for strategic planning, organizational management and Board engagement of the official homeland security initiative for the American Jewish Community. He oversees coordination and engagement between federal law enforcement and over 200 organizations. SCN is recognized by U.S. Department of Homeland Security as a national model.

We have a great conversation with a resolute and passionate advocate for the security and safety of this country and his stakeholders.

Integrating ”Security and Safety” into the Fabric of the Business

Integrating ”Security and Safety” into the Fabric of the Business

May 31, 2022

Tyson Aiken is a former executive at Nike with an intelligence background from the CIA. He left Nike and went on a journey exploring different opportunities in the commercial marketplace. When I spoke with him before and during his “sabbatical”, I discovered that his purpose and passion could never be realized in a typical security executive role. I felt he needed to be ‘at the executive table’, like many of his peers but with one striking difference: he needed an organizational model anchored with core values and a mission he could believe in.

He found one with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), a global company with over 4,000 people, many who are thought leaders in their field. Navigating risk and the opportunity to save endangered species and the world, WCS could be classified as a “security and safety” organization for animals and its people.

This great conversation explores .com, .gov, and .org business models, the way growth and profit can obstruct good judgement, and the integration of the business model with a data driven security model.

Enjoy the conversation!

The Tail Wagging the Dog

The Tail Wagging the Dog

May 31, 2022

CEOs manage risk and opportunity. How well they do that determines their path to value.

So, who should be at the table helping the C-level team navigate risk and opportunity? What data should be collected, organized, analyzed, and communicated? How should it be contextualized to meet the needs of each departmental function? (HR, Legal, Finance, Operations, etc.).

Once these questions are answered you suddenly realize that the success of the next generation risk, resilience, and security leader will depend on their ability to grasp how the digital transformation is positioning them for a strategic role in the organizational outcomes of the business. The tail (Security) may be wagging the dog (The Business) very soon… a paradigm shift.

We have a great conversation with the founders of a protective intelligence platform, Lukas Quanstrom and Tom Kopecky of Ontic, that have recently articulated this vision and is actively creating a community of like-minded leaders across the ecosystem.

Security: The Great Enabler of Organizational Strength

Security: The Great Enabler of Organizational Strength

May 31, 2022

Every profession has its pioneers. The ones who worked with sticky notes and clunky first-generation SQL databases. They had the opportunity and skills to create, document, and teach their learnings to future generations. And they had a front row seat to how their ideas evolved into the future.

Scott Stewart, Vice President of Intelligence for TorchStone Global,  is one of those pioneers for protective intelligence and counter surveillance. We had the opportunity to meet at a protective intelligence summit hosted by Ontic and we decided to compare notes on our learnings in this great conversation podcast.

You get a sense of the man, the profession, and the future of the risk, resilience, and security industry as one of the great enablers of organizational strength and competitiveness.

Enjoy the conversation.

His Job is to Make Others Fear Less

His Job is to Make Others Fear Less

May 31, 2022

In this conversation, we have the opportunity to dive into how technology may disrupt the executive protection profession. Most of us recognize that our brains are wired to resist uncertainty. We seem to grasp and hold on to the potential negative outcomes rather than seize the uncertain opportunities that stare us in the face.

Mark Ledlow has dealt with uncertainty and fear. And he has been paid to remove it for his clients. To help them fear less. Interesting enough, he shows his courage by being transparent about the gut check he gave himself after attending a protective intelligence summit hosted by Ontic, a technology company. He sees the change and his need to adapt and it makes for a great conversation. Mark is the CEO of Ledlow Security Group that provides Physical Security, Site Security, Supply Chain Security, Disaster Response Teams, and Executive Protection for High Networth Families and Executives.

He also hosts The Fearless Mindset Podcast where he welcomes the security Industry's best and brightest to learn about the tactics and strategies they use to protect the world's wealthiest families during these unprecedented times. 

People with Passion Will Change the World

People with Passion Will Change the World

May 31, 2022

He is a successful entrepreneur (Shooter Detection Systems), CEO (Milcom Security Solutions), and a sought-after board advisor (Fusus). He is adept at identifying needs and finding the means to deliver value. It isn’t a surprise then, that he is flying to the border of Poland and Ukraine on Saturday, May 28, to attempt to make life a little bit easier for the soldiers and the refugees of this terrible conflict.

We have a great conversation with Christian Connors who traveled to Medyka Poland to assist the World Central Kitchen in their efforts to provide Ukrainian refugees with food. He has a GoFundMe page to buy items that bring a smile to the faces of these amazing people. These items include Coca-Cola, M&Ms, Red Bull, kid’s toys and new mother's assistance such as diapers and pacifiers. Christian pays for his own travel costs and 100% of the funds go to buying items that are not available at the border crossing.

Wouldn’t it be amazing if The Great Conversation community takes action on this idea by donating to the World Central Kitchen and/or the GoFundMe fundraiser? Ideas shape markets. Ideas can change the world.

Here I Am. Send Me.

Here I Am. Send Me.

May 9, 2022

The greatest challenge of our time is challenging the notion that our democratic ideals no longer work in a world dominated by authoritarians acting with impunity on the world stage. As well, when our own leaders or institutions fail us, we still need people who can stand in the gap.

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?” And I said, “Here am I. Send me!” Isaiah 6:8

This quote is often spoken over the graves of our fallen warriors. The context: the world is falling apart. Confidence in institutions and leaders have fallen apart. But there are those that still answer the call to protect us.

I was able to sit down with a prolific best-selling author who, under the guise of telling an incredibly fast paced and exciting thriller architected around a former Navy Seal Sniper, has created a powerful path to value for all of us.

The books are interlaced with powerful ideas around purpose, mission, passion, and courage juxtaposed against evil, the erosion of personal freedom, the counterfeit ideas of misguided faith, and the leverage and management of fear.

The author, Jack Carr, is a former Navy Seal who led special operations teams as a team leader and platoon and troop commander in hot spots around the world, including Iraq and Afghanistan. But he is so much more. Well read, a student of history and warfare, with a life-long interest in taking his learnings and translating them into powerful stories, Jack Carr is now on the cusp of releasing his fifth book, In the Blood. He has released one every year since 2018. And this year, his main character, James Reese, will appear on Amazon Prime set for July 2022.

We have a great conversation around his great character and his path to value. We find the path is ours as well.

I Can Only Solve What I Can See

I Can Only Solve What I Can See

May 1, 2022

She has traveled all over the world and her journey intersected with some of the pivotal moments in the world’s troubled history.

But you would never know it.

She is humble; a disarming openness that draws you in. And, once in, you can see why she has been successful.

Wendy Bashnan is the CSO of Nielsen. Nielsen shapes the world’s media and content as a global leader in audience insights, data, and analytics. Through an understanding of people and their behaviors across all channels and platforms, they empower their clients with independent and actionable intelligence so they can connect and engage with their audiences—now and into the future. An S&P 500 company, Nielsen (NYSE: NLSN) operates around the world in more than 55 countries.

Wendy and I have a great conversation around how the emerging interconnected, intelligence platform will empower security leaders to a new level of organizational value.

“I can only solve what I can see.”

And, may I say, we are currently not seeing enough of the picture to play a strategic role within the organization. But we will. The new intelligence highway is rapidly becoming a reality. Enjoy the conversation and see if you agree.

Are you a Hitchhiker, a Driver, or the Car?

Are you a Hitchhiker, a Driver, or the Car?

May 1, 2022

As I have watched many industries evolve, I have paid particular attention to those companies who have thrived in the midst of change. I also have taken note of the people who fought the change and tried to understand why? When the opportunity was uncertain, then control and constraint were the weapons they deployed.

Where are they now?

After speaking to our guest, I believe they either were left behind or, later, attempted to “hitchhike” onto the speeding car on the highway. Those who embraced the change were either driving the car or created businesses that became the car.

I had the opportunity to talk to a highly valued Risk Intelligence Consultant, Chris Story. Chris also is highly interconnected through his work with the International Protective Security Board (IPSB), a non-profit promoting the advancement of protection professionals worldwide. He also works with Chuck Randolph on the podcast known as Conversations in Close Protection (CiCP).

Chris and I reflect on what we learned at a recent Protective Intelligence Summit hosted by Ontic where we shared stories of those that took note of changes in their industry and profession and embraced the change and those who did not.

The protectors are about to learn this. And those who embrace the change will be future leaders in the risk, resilience, and security industry.

Entering the Arena with a Warrior Spirit

Entering the Arena with a Warrior Spirit

May 1, 2022

He was a Senior Vice President and Chief Security Officer for Verizon, a veteran, and one of the highest-ranking special agents in the FBI (who happen to be black) before retiring and becoming a school bus driver. The bridge was easy to cross if you are a true servant leader. His name is Michael Mason. We know him well. He was one of the most captivating speakers at our Great Conversation events before the pandemic. But he also sat in the front row taking notes as others spoke before and after him.

To get in his head and his heart, I decided to have a great conversation with him coinciding with the publication of his new book: Working in America - Spectator or Gladiator...You Decide

The book is designed for those who want to navigate the “white water rapids of the American workplace” with courage, discipline, kindness, and strength. Seizing the day requires you to get in the game, because the “world owes you nothing”, as Mike’s father once told him.

I hope you enjoy this lively conversation. It is like reading a good book animated by a voice that is clear and engaging.

To Protect and Enable

To Protect and Enable

May 1, 2022

Thought leaders are defined by the mountains they climb, the vistas they see, and their ability to articulate to others the how and why of the journey.

Adam Cambridge, a leader in Enterprise Risk Intelligence at Mitre, was recently acknowledged for his efforts in the Protective Intelligence profession at a summit hosted by Ontic.

We explore how his education and experience created the foundation for his passion for intelligence gathering; aggregating and analyzing information that could predict breaches or incidents for organizations and the world.

We also learn about his scorecard for great leaders and how this will be important for the next evolution of the industry. And fundamentally, we exchange ideas for how the role of security is changing in an exciting way; no longer defined just by what we protect, but how we enable the organization to achieve its goals.

On the Intelligence Autobahn: Riding Toward the Future of Security

On the Intelligence Autobahn: Riding Toward the Future of Security

May 1, 2022

“It was staring us in the face, but we just couldn’t see it.”

This is the conundrum many face when it comes to navigating risk and opportunity. Many things conspire to keep us from seeing and seizing the opportunity. Organizational silos. Fear of change. Cost vs. Return on the Opportunity (different than ROI).

I was fortunate to listen to a powerful story of navigating risk and opportunity by Ontic’s Chief Product Officer, Manish Mehta at the recent Protective Intelligence Summit. And I followed up with him on our Great Conversation Podcast around the opportunity that is gradually being “seen” and deployed by leaders in the risk, resilience, and security industry.

Listen in, connect the dots, and enjoy the ride along the new, interconnected, intelligence highway.

Manish has over 25 years of market leadership in software development, In his role as Chief Product Officer, he is the principal evangelist linking customers, partners and product development teams together in a highly collaborative and strategic web of innovation.

Moving the Aspirational and Relational Dial of Leadership

Moving the Aspirational and Relational Dial of Leadership

March 31, 2022

We used to think job security was important. And it may be. But what if the real need is to belong to something bigger than ourselves?

I sit down with an accomplished executive coach who has been helping C-suite executives around the world unlock their leadership power to deliver on their strategic and personal objectives. She is a former global HR executive with a highly attuned ability to listen to her clients deeper than the words they are using and the stories they are telling.

She has been travelling to Central America since 2014 with an organization called The Business Council for Peace (Bpeace), an award-winning nonprofit working in crisis-affected communities to grow small and medium-size businesses, create significant employment for all, and expand the economic power of women. To Bpeace: “More jobs mean less violence.®”

What I found extraordinary about Angel Scalpello, the founder of the Scalpello Group, is how she bridges the profit and non-profit world with her competencies and gets her hands dirty in the process. Although she sits on the board of directors, she personally advises and trains budding business owners in some of the most distressed parts of the world.

We have a great conversation, and, as always, we discover important questions we should be asking ourselves and our leaders.

Supporting the Security Ecosystem at the Edge

Supporting the Security Ecosystem at the Edge

March 31, 2022

I first became acquainted with Jon Polly’s ideas and competencies through his articles on smart buildings and cities. I knew that many systems integrators and technology vendors were not equipped to carry on a great conversation on those topics.

But security is no longer a silo. It is becoming deeply embedded in digital transformation initiatives at the corporate and consumer level. Design thinking must become more holistic and the value proposition more integrated into the very fabric of the living building and the living city.

Jon doesn’t believe in going it alone. He wants to extend the vendor ecosystem to support the new initiatives creating a force multiplier for the end client and their trusted security systems integrator. The partner model is not new. However, I believe it will take on new urgency in the future.

Executive Summit Series Preview

Executive Summit Series Preview

March 31, 2022

Get ready to take a deep breath. Imagine juggling the following:

  • President of the National Economic Security Alliance

  • Leadership Council Member of the National Business Association

  • Senior Fellow Emeritus of Auburn University’s McCrary Institute for Cyber and Critical Infrastructure Security

  • Distinguished Fellow of the Ponemon Institute

  • Chairman Emeritus of the Board of Directors of the National Intellectual Property Law Institute

  • Board Member, International Security Management Association (ISMA)

  • CEO of Mattice and Associates

  • Keynote speaker for strategic forums like The Great Conversation

Okay. You can breathe now.

Take all this experience and you can see why we partnered with Lynn in 2018 and 2019 to create the Executive Summit Series leveraging Lynn’s background as a CSO and the track record above.

The pandemic forced us to pivot, and Lynn is now directing the future of the Executive Summit Series. The next one will take place on April 28, 2022, as an anchor event for DSAC week and will be held, as in previous years, at The Boeing Company in Arlington, VA.

Lynn and I sit down to discuss his agenda outline.

Enjoy the conversation.

The Listening Leader

The Listening Leader

March 31, 2022

The former global head of communications and crisis management at one of the world’s largest insurance companies, became an international business coach on strategic communications through his company The Orvieto Academy for Communicative Leadership.

We speak with him from Rome, where he has been since the pandemic.

Emilio is a thought leader in communicative leadership which focuses on empowering and strengthening leaders and employees. He is the chairman of Italy’s largest change management consulting group as well as teaches leadership principles through his virtual and onsite workshops around the world.

We talk about his journey and finish with the six tipping points of leadership that he has focused on during the pandemic. We discover a curious mind, driven by a passion for people and learning. And we are left with key steps in our path to values-based leadership.

Redefining VUCA to Inspire and Foster Confidence in the Future

Redefining VUCA to Inspire and Foster Confidence in the Future

March 31, 2022

We have been using VUCA (Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, and Ambiguity) to describe the world in which we live and our response to it since the United States Army War College used it following the 9/11 terrorist attacks in 2001. Imagine what military planners faced with a radically different international security environment that had emerged. VUCA was used to describe it. Now business, in this age of digital transformation and expanded risk, is using it as well.

Let’s face it, risks and opportunities abound in a VUCA world. The risks are hard to see because they are multi-layered and intersect in a “tangled mesh of reaction and counter-reaction”. And we find, much to our dismay that not everything is black and white. And change is the only constant. Just when you think you are there, there is a shift, and all your old mental models no longer apply. This causes uncertainty, doubt, and fear, often paralyzing us while the window of opportunity to address the risk and seize the opportunity closes.

We have been pursuing the guides that can help us be better leaders in this VUCA world, and we found another in Germany: Waltrud Glaeser.

We have a great conversation around helping leaders “return to curiosity” about themselves, the others around them, and their impact on their companies and the world. We come away with a positive substitution for the VUCA acronym: Vision, Understanding, Clarity, and Adaptability. And that is a worthy starting point for leader’s growth, personally, professionally, and within the context of their business.

What if Seeing and Knowing was a Practice?

What if Seeing and Knowing was a Practice?

February 28, 2022

I had a great conversation with a former FBI Special Agent and Head of Counterintelligence Behavioral Analysis Program (RET) who spent 21+ years of working counterintelligence.

I was intrigued on what he had learned about reading people. What I was not prepared for was his relentless flywheel of learning that he has developed to become a better person and leader.

The tools he developed are used to achieve self-mastery in observation, communication, and execution from a foundation of humility and transparency, whether it is with your perceived enemy, an employee, or a friend.

Robin Dreeke spent 21 years in the FBI before starting The People Formula and authoring a number of books on leadership and trust including It’s Not All About “Me”, The Code of Trust, and his latest, Sizing People Up.

As you can imagine, you can’t help but immerse yourself in his world and come out a better person as a result.

Enjoy the conversation.

Security Leading Organizational Change?!

Security Leading Organizational Change?!

February 28, 2022

No one wants to see this picture. (Podcast listeners, go to our blog on March 15, 2020). It offends us. It depresses us. But it is a graphic example of Gallup’s recent poll on the disengagement of the workforce. In this conversation, we find two amazing leaders who decided to change that narrative in their own unique way. It is a conversation of hope in the midst of the Great Resignation.

“For the first year in more than a decade, the percentage of engaged workers in the U.S. declined in 2021. Just over one-third of employees (34%) were engaged, and 16% were actively disengaged in their work and workplace, based on a random sample of 57,022 full- and part-time employees throughout the year. This compares with 36% engaged and 14% actively disengaged in 2020, a year with unprecedented highs and lows.” Gallup Survey

 

The data scares you, but it is not surprising. In the middle of the “Great Resignation” Gallup’s new survey says that only a third of employees are engaged in their work. That means 66% are not. And 16% are actively disengaged. Actively disengaged means feeling miserable at work and spreading negativity to their colleagues.

But what if you found a way to change that? What if you excelled at engagement? Gallup suggests it could be a force multiplier in improving your profitability, your productivity, your turnover, and your absenteeism (which costs businesses a half trillion a year).

Imagine my surprise when I found a security team leading the charge in changing their corporate culture. And they did it in a highly creative and innovative way. First in their own department and then across the company.

Join me for a great conversation with the former CSO of one of the largest utilities in the United States, Stan Partlow, and one of his former executives who had the idea 5 years ago, Sam Queeno, and led the ground-breaking new initiative that is still operating today.

The Chief Legal Officer’s Strategic Partner: Security

The Chief Legal Officer’s Strategic Partner: Security

February 28, 2022

I have had the opportunity to meet many of the executives who planned on attending the Protective Intelligence Summit hosted by Ontic last month. Staying true to the summit’s theme to “widen the aperture of security”, I had been meeting with HR, CISOs, CSOs, CCOs, and Chief Legal Officers (CLOs).

I also was preparing to facilitate a discussion around uniting Legal and Security at the Summit. Before I did so, I decided to meet with Ontic’s CLO.

Scott Shepherd has a unique background.  He had been the CLO at Khoros and the VP of Legal at Spredfast. Prior to Spredfast, he was a General Counsel, law firm partner, and USMC Lieutenant Colonel. His educational background spans public policy, political science, and law.

I also was interested in the survey Ontic had done across these leadership disciplines and how it would apply to the CLO function. I found an excellent article written by Scott and Fred Burton, an industry thought leader in protective intelligence, written for the legal profession.

We sit down, discuss the article, his experience and his learnings from the industry and the survey.

Enjoy the conversation.

Security’s Strategic Seat at the Table

Security’s Strategic Seat at the Table

February 28, 2022

When we were preparing to participate in a Protective Intelligence Summit hosted by Ontic, Steven Antoine and I decided to have a great conversation about some of the agonizingly persistent questions around the functional role of the risk, resilience, and security leader.

Steven is the Vice President of Global Security for the North American Pepsico organization. Before that, he was the CSO of Global Assets Protection for Yum! Brands. At Yum!, we encountered a marketing philosophy driven by Yum’s former CEO called R.E.D. And we began to apply it to our views of the Security Industry.

  • R: Relevance – Is Security relevant to the organization? Is it mission critical?

  • E: Easy – Is Security easy to understand and use? Is it easily translatable to the navigation of risk and opportunity that the C Suite is facing real-time every day?

  • D: Distinctive – If you benchmarked how Security partners with the C Suite, would your Security organization stand out? Would it be distinctively valuable?

As you listen to this great conversation, you will see a naturally inquisitive mind and a natural leader asking the tough questions about security’s role in the organization and ultimately its value.

Enjoy the conversation.

The Evolution of a Risk, Resilience, and Security Organization

The Evolution of a Risk, Resilience, and Security Organization

February 28, 2022

Brian Tuskan is a senior executive leader (CSO) for a Fortune 500 organization that we have known since the early days of The Great Conversation. His ability to absorb new technology, leadership skills, and industry experience and learnings, has allowed him to grow personally and professionally.

We caught up with him to understand what was front of mind for him and to help us define security’s evolving role in the era of digital transformation, threat intelligence platforms, work from home, and the breadth and depth of global risk conditions.

Brian is also the founder and host of Cop to Corporate, a webcast featuring strategies for law enforcement professionals seeking to transition to the corporate world.

Protect to Enable

Protect to Enable

February 28, 2022

I rarely meet people who are trying to anticipate change in a healthy way. The one’s who do practice a rigorous discipline of inquiry without assuming what they have learned is enough to navigate the risks and opportunities of tomorrow.

Nathan Mills, a senior enterprise risk management executive in Zoom is such a person. With a unique background in technology, business operations, intelligence, and security, he is helping his organization to live their group’s mission of "Protect to Enable"

His group is blazing new ground in developing a world-class physical security and business resilience program inside a converged cyber-physical security organization.

Enjoy the conversation.

Leadership and the Risk Advisor

Leadership and the Risk Advisor

February 28, 2022

Dale Buckner, CEO of Global Guardian, a risk management, and advisory firm, is a trusted supplier to global organizations around the world.

We have been following Dale for some time, and his public briefings are enormously powerful.

This great conversation is relevant to CEOs and their board of directors. It revolves around the question: “What have you done over the past two years to create competitive advantage from this generational shift that is occurring around the world?” This shift is impacting how we model our businesses, interact with our employees, and how we finally integrate security into the primary mission of the CEO and their teams: to leverage risk and opportunity to create a valuable company.

Enjoy the conversation.

The Frameworks We Use to Define Security May Hold Us Back

The Frameworks We Use to Define Security May Hold Us Back

February 16, 2022

There are recurring questions that risk, resilience, security, and business leaders have been asking themselves for years. They are common themes we hear at the seminars and conferences alike. Questions like:

  • Is security mission critical to the execution of the business?
  • If so, how is this evidenced in the strategic planning and execution of the executive management team (EMT)? (CFO, CIO, CISO, CLO, HR, and CSO)
  • Is it important for security to be the responsibility of multiple people in an organization, including those outside of the security discipline? 
  • Who are the core members of the EMT that security relies upon?
  • Does security drive business continuity and reputation strategies or is it a supporting function?
  • How can security professionals best gain budget and buy-in for corporate security in their organizations?
  • Is security seen as a cost center? If so, how do you prove its value?
  • How does current technology support cross functional collaboration, communication, and the measures of value that support its strategic role of helping navigate risk and opportunity for the members of the executive management team?

I will be providing some of the answers I received from a recent polling of the Great Conversation community. I also want to share this recent conversation I had with the Founder and CEO of Concentric Security, Mark Oakes. He takes a multi-disciplinary, creative look at industrial security, some of the stories security practitioners have been telling themselves for years as well as some new, useful mental models we can use to improve our thinking processes.

This is a fascinating and great conversation around how we see, know, and act as both security professionals, as human beings… and as leaders. These insights can positively impact the stories we tell ourselves in the future.

Preparing for the Protective Intelligence Summit

Preparing for the Protective Intelligence Summit

January 31, 2022

One of the key disciplines I have leveraged and taught falls under a personal philosophy of mine: “Never waste an opportunity to learn”

On February 21-23, Ontic, a leading platform for protective intelligence, is hosting a thought leader forum. It promises to be an inflection point for the organizational leaders who influence the policies, procedures, people, and tools around proactive risk management. We are talking about CSOs, CLOs, COOs, CFOs, and CEOs. Risk is now everyone’s business because it impacts the reach and resilience of business which also impacts its brand.

My discipline is to go over the agenda, research the speaker’s backgrounds, research the subject, and then determine the questions I have on the subject matter. I must cultivate an inquiring mind by doing my own research or I become a consumer instead of an active listener. The good news is I asked a fellow attendee who is an executive with a risk management company to review our options with me.

Chuck Randolph has been a senior director of threat intelligence and executive protection at Microsoft and is now Senior Director of Operations for an international risk advisory and executive protection firm called AT-RISK International. We have a great conversation around our potential learnings and the quality of the speakers and the topics.

 
Learning How to Live

Learning How to Live

January 31, 2022

Most people are looking for something. Early on it could be as simple as love from a parent or friends. It might evolve into living vicariously through our heroes. Then attention naturally focuses on a career path, a search for a combination of recognition, or power, or wealth.

But very few of us think about our end of days.

I was originally attracted to Nick Brossit, Ed.D. through a posting on LinkedIn where he was sharing his journey dealing with pancreatic cancer. He has over 32 years in formal public education – 22 years as a Superintendent in two different school districts in Washington State. He also generously gives of his time as a leadership coach and consultant.

We have a great conversation about his path to value, personally and professionally. We touch on servant leadership, having a north star, and the nature of wholeness as a platform to lead others. And, finally, we come full circle to how that path prepared him for a cancer diagnosis that could eventually kill him.

 I was humbled by his gift, his grace, and his faith.

What Leaders can Learn from PTSD

What Leaders can Learn from PTSD

January 31, 2022

There is no one way to look at PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder). According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) there are 636,120 ways to have PTSD.

However, those of us who have not been diagnosed with PTSD can learn a lot from those who have served our combat veterans on how to deal with stress and trauma, especially in these uncertain times.

One of our Great Conversation leaders introduced us to Dr. Dan Libby, Executive Director of the Veterans Yoga Project (VYP), a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization whose mission is to support recovery and resilience among our veterans, families, and communities. He and his organization are working with hundreds, if not thousands, each week, helping them to navigate a VUCA (volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous) world. Here is a quote from Dr. Libby based on an early recognition of the power of yoga on one of his early clients:

“A turning point in the founding of VYP occurred before the fourth “mindful yoga” class I had ever taught. One of my veterans approached me and told me that he had stopped taking his sleep medications, because now he could meditate to go to sleep. That moment was profound. The pride with which he told me this was palpable. It is as if he were no longer a broken man who could not manage the simplest of human functions; instead, he was empowered to use his own mind, his own breath, his own body to live and sleep, in a way that brought him more ease and more joy. He practiced every day. Eventually, he went on to lead morning meditations in his own community at a local yoga center.”

 We have a Great Conversation around the unique benefits of yoga in training the body and mind, eventually training yourself to be at peace with what you find in any moment. I came away with the sense that if I could get to that state, as a leader, I could see more clearly the people around me and the circumstances that were confronting them with empathy and without judgement. In a sense, we wake up, freed from emotional constructs that can lead us astray.

Dr. Libby is much more eloquent. Enjoy the conversation.

The Organization is not a Machine; It is a Person

The Organization is not a Machine; It is a Person

January 31, 2022

Something is wrong. We have so many tools within our reach that would position our organizations more strategically, improve our processes exponentially, and create value within our market ecosystems. But for some reason, we cannot get our people to believe that their work is essential to their life and well-being. Work has become something you do while you are waiting for life to begin. You can see it and hear it. Just listen:

  • TGIF (Thank God it is Friday)

  • I am only working here until I get a better offer somewhere else

  • One day I can retire and not have to do this anymore

  • Our leaders only care about money and power

How did this happen?

There is a company, Quantum Leaders, that would tell you that all the Six Sigma, Balanced Scorecarding, and Wellness Programs you have put into place are good. But they would point you to the facts: People are still not engaged. We explore this ugly truth and how we might begin a journey of discovery that might lead to change in how we view the world, and ourselves in it. And it might just make your organization more competitive, more efficient, and more resilient.

Welcome to The Great Conversation around a radical concept: Your organization is a living person.

Siri: Can You Please Open the Door?

Siri: Can You Please Open the Door?

January 31, 2022

In business, we start with how people think, feel, and respond. We put tools in their hands. The tools inspire behavior. They become personal and professional. And if you are one of the fortunate, yet small minority, that is successful harnessing their positive reaction to your tool, you are on the path to value.

I seldom see the agents of change be motivated by purely money. They usually seek impact. They consider their legacy; and they want to win. Winning to them is about seizing the opportunity so that they, the market, and their customer, flourish.

I am fortunate to be able to speak with these people at different stages of their thinking. Stephen Pineau, the CEO of Gloocel is my latest. Gloocel seeks to dramatically lower the cost and improve the experience of building owners and their stakeholders, by cutting the cord using mobile and the cloud.

But enjoy the lessons that lurk below the specific market and product. It is another Great Conversation.

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